Courtyard Wallpieces

May 22nd, 2017

Over the weekend I made two wallpieces for my courtyard garden. The wallpieces will break up the wall while acting as trellises for vines.

Courtyard Wallpiece

Courtyard Wallpiece

The wall has a step design that makes it difficult for spacing. I tried equal spacing between and around the wallpieces, but the edge of the right wallpiece hit a step in the wall that visually wasn’t working.

I moved the pieces to 3 feet from the corners. Still didn’t feel right.

Courtyard Wallpiece

I am leaning toward placing the wallpieces centered with the wall steps. In the center of the wall is a Cordia boissieri (Texas Wild Olive).

Cordia boissieri

It is small now, but should eventually fill the space.

Courtyard Wallpiece

The wallieces were made using simple Bargello embroidery stitches. Materials List–1 inch fence (41″ x 31″), coconut fiber rope, and sisal rope.

Courtyard Wallpiece Rope

Safety when working with fiber–wear a respirator, gloves, and a long sleeve shirt.

Coconut fiber is beautiful, but it is extremely prickly, dusty, and dirty. This is part of what I swept up.

Courtyard Wallpiece Dust


Terrarium Update

May 19th, 2017

Terrarium

Terrarium after the removal of plants 2017 February 5.

Terrarium

Today

Terrarium

Terrarium

Terrarium

Terrarium

Something green growing?

Previous post.


What is it?

May 18th, 2017

Cooktop

It is not solder on metal.

Cooktop

It is burnt sugar on a glass cooktop. Burnt sugar is quite beautiful.

Cooktop

It appears that the pan had come in contact with the strawberry pie dish. Why was the bottom of the pan left unwashed???

Previous post on sugar and its possible use as an art material.

Burnt Sugar


Tree Bark and Tomato Plants

May 12th, 2017

Today I went to the neighborhood Farm Supply to purchase tomato plants. Just as I got out of the car I saw this–

Tree

I paused to take a look. I have no clue what the rest of the tree looked like. I was only able to focus on the details.

Tree

Great ideas for future work.

Tomato plants purchased:

Tomato Plants


Again With the Casemaking Moths and Possible Easy Solution

May 10th, 2017

I am in the process of cleaning and clearing my studio in order to have enough space to begin a new project.

While cleaning my work bench I found casemaking moths.

Casemaking Moths

Casemaking moth in a small bowl of cold wax test pieces.
The casemaking moth is in the center on the penny bound with wool.

Finding the casemaking moths brought to mind a recent conversation I had with an entomologist. I specifically asked him how to address the casemaking moth problem.

He said that an easy solution was to put my work in the my car. What would that accomplish? One of the ways to kill casemaking moths is to use heat. He also recommended tossing the stuff in a plastic bin with a few moth balls. I don’t recall which moth balls he recommended, naphthalene or paradichlorobenzene. I would prefer not using chemicals.

But, it never occurred to me to use the heat in the car. That would be an easy fix, especially since most of my work will not fit in the freezer.

He mentioned that his wife had success killing an insect infestation in the wood horn of a recently purchased used saddle.

Previous Posts

It is Not a Pod…

What Happened?

Casemaking Moth Damage

Casemaking Moth Damage–Alpaca yarn embroidered on harware cloth.

Tinea pellionella

A Perfect Environment for Moths


Would the interior temperature in a car kill moths?

American Veterinary Medical Association

AVMA Temp Chart

The AVMA credits–Jan Null, CCM; Department of Geosciences, San Francisco State University,
for creating the estimated vehicle interior temperature chart.

Alternatives, A Washington Toxics Coalition Fact Sheet, Clothing Moths-Prevention and Control by Jennie Goldberg states–“High heat (in excess of 99”F for one week) will destroy all life stages of the moth.”

It appears that the interior temperature of a car will kill moths.
Need to perform some tests to find out for sure.


The Trapped Cactus is in bloom!

May 8th, 2017

Trapped Cactus

Trapped Cactus

Trapped Cactus

Trapped Cactus

Trapped Cactus


Volunteer: Geranium dissectum

May 3rd, 2017

Volunteer

Volunteer Plants with Wee Pink Flowers

How small all the flowers?

Volunteer

Decided to harvest seed from the volunteer plants. I assumed that the seed was ready when they looked like this…

Volunteer

But are they? While harvesting, I noticed this change–

Volunteer

Volunteer

It wasn’t until I looked at the photographs that I noticed the red tips–

Volunteer

It is such a lovely plant. Can’t wait to grow more and should not have a problem doing so since they are showing up on invasive plant sites. Perhaps I should rethink introducing the plants into my courtyard garden.

Wildflowers of the United States

Invasive Species Compendium

Invasive.org

University of California Statewide Integrated Pest Management


Dropped Leaves

April 30th, 2017

Plant

Succulent

The color of the leaves is definitely not right.
I took the photo with my iPad in my studio.
The color of the leaves should be a grey green.

Succulent

Flip side of the small leaf.
When I gathered the leaves I noticed that they felt soft and very warm.
Like a thick bunny ear.

Succulent

The leaves collect everything.
It is common for earwigs to live all cozy in the top leaves.
I give the leaves a weekly cleaning with a soft bristle brush.

Four leaves fell. I am drying two and the other two are sitting in a glycerin solution, just to see what happens.

Art material? Molds or stitching?


Weeds or Flowers?

April 29th, 2017

Weeds or Flowers

Volunteers in my garden.

Weeds or Flowers

Keep or Remove?

Definitely keep. Plan to harvest seed and plant in other parts of my gardens.

Weeds or Flowers


What’s Growing?

April 21st, 2017

I planted two Tabebuia seeds each in five peat pots, 6 November 2016. I went away for three weeks in March. Before I left I watered the pots and then wrapped them in plastic.

Today I did not find Tabebuia growing, but found something green.

Tabebuia

Do I pot up the growth or wait to see if Tabebuia plants surface?